The Extremist Spectrum: Anjem Chaudhry to Yasser Habib

By Haseeb Rizvi

March 16, 2016

Extremists exist in every community and society around the world. This isn’t different with the Muslim community either. Extremist ideologies have embedded themselves within Muslim communities, luring people towards division, anger and hatred. Many extremists provoke sectarianism and division between various Muslim sects and groups. And hate-preaching extremists lie on both sides of this spectrum.

On one side, you have the likes of Anjem Chaudhry – notorious for causing controversy in the streets of the UK with his group of young angry Salafis openly declaring support for terrorist groups such as Al Qaeda and ISIS. His group and like-minded individuals will routinely berate Shia Muslims and insult them, and in 2013 even attacked Shia bystanders at a demonstration in London.

On the other side you have people like Yasser Habib, a cleric who calls himself a Shia Muslim and uses the medium of satellite TV and YouTube to incite hatred against Sunni Muslims as well as other Shia Muslims. By stoking the flames of enmity and hatred amongst extreme groups, his actions have contributed towards sectarian killings against Shia Muslims by terrorists across Africa, Middle East and Asia – the same terrorists endorsed by the likes of Chaudhry.

Essentially both ends of the spectrum are benefiting each other, whilst Muslims around the world are being killed.

People like Chaudhry manipulate young passionate Sunnis against Shias and cite people like Habib. People like Habib manipulate young Shias against Sunnis, and cite people like Chaudhry. Ironically, both extremes have only a handful of followers, but have a mysteriously large reach through media and a notably strong source of funding.

They both operate from the UK too, with the police, intelligence and government very well aware of what they’re doing. Anjem Chaudhry has been detained for questioning by the Met Police on several occasions related to terrorism and inciting hatred. Notoriously, people linked to Chaudhry have been convicted of terrorism. Habib was granted asylum by the British after being arrested and exiled from Kuwait for inciting sectarian hatred. It is believed Kuwait is still where Habib receives large donations from. Donations at a scale which make no proportional sense in comparison to other Shia Muslim organisations and institutions.

Through their sectarian and extreme rhetoric, the likes of Anjem Chaudhry and Yasser Habib are serving the agenda of those who have an enmity against Islam, such as the Zio-capitalists.

The plot against the Muslim Ummah is to see us divided and destroyed through deception.

For years – before Chaudhry and Habib – it has been revealed people like Abu Hamza were working with the intelligence agencies (MI5) to serve their agenda. Abu Hamza dominated the headlines for the best part of a decade fuelling the anti-Islam narrative through the media.

Western Muslims should be aware of such plans, lest we are deceived into traps of sectarianism which compromise the foundations of our religion.

We need to increase our efforts against such extremists who are directly and indirectly responsible for the spilling of blood of our brothers and sisters in our Motherlands. This same sectarian violence can easily spread here if we are not vigilant and assertive of our ideological stand.

Source: /themuslimvibe.com/muslim-current-affairs-news/analysis/the-extremist-spectrum-anjem-chaudhry-to-yasser-habib

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/radical-islamism-and-jihad/haseeb-rizvi/the-extremist-spectrum–anjem-chaudhry-to-yasser-habib/d/106690

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